Show me the EVIDENCE!!! (Part 2)

My last post was about my excited plans to launch instruction on text based evidence with my first graders. I have enjoyed working on this so far, especially with the use of the TBE graph but am starting to have a few road blocks. Here are my top three:

1. It is difficult to explain to my first graders how to structure their response. I am not sure if I am simply expecting too much of these young students or if I am not explaining it well myself. The literacy coach who I am working with this year shared the following document with me that I am thinking of revising into an anchor chart to use with my students:

R.A.C.E. How to completely answer reading response questions.

Restate the question

(say it in your own words)

________________________________

________________________________
________________________________
________________________________

Answer the question ________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Cite evidence from the text

(use examples from the text that support your answer)

________________________________
________________________________
________________________________

________________________________

Extend your answer

(explain your answer using examples from your schema)

________________________________
________________________________

________________________________

________________________________

**Check over your work:  

  1. Capital Letters.
  2. Punctuation marks.
  3. Your BEST handwriting.
  4. Reread your work to check that it makes sense.  

This R.A.C.E. sheet was created by a 4th grade teacher in my district so this may be a bit audacious to try with my first graders. I want to challenge them and prepare them for what they are going to see even more in upper grades but I also do not want to cause mass amounts of confusion.

2. It is really hard to explain to first graders how to only cite the part of the text that tells the answer or gives the evidence. Often they quote way too much of the book or not enough because I think it is still difficult for them to pin point exactly where the evidence is located. They can do this more easily when working with me, but have a harder time on their own. Part of this is likely due to the fact that many of them are still learning the mechanics of reading the words. I am planning to start pulling texts a level or two below for them to practice TBE rather than just their guided reading texts on their instructional level.

3. I still have a few students who forget to finishing their journal prompt prior to our next reading group. I am hoping that with time using the TBE graph, they will see that I am going to hold them accountable for completing their own work and that positive peer influence will inspire those few students to complete their work as well. I would love any insight that you might have on how to help students be self-sufficient and timely in completing their independent reading work. This is not just a problem with really low students. One of the highest students in my class is struggling with this as well.

Despite these roadblocks, I am really proud of the effort my students have put into using TBE and am proud of the progress that I see many already making! Here are a few snapshots from our work this week:

IMG_7498IMG_7519IMG_7521IMG_7499IMG_7501IMG_7500

I would love to hear any insight you have on how to inspire even more text-based evidence!

Thanks!

~Mrs. L

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Show me the EVIDENCE!!! (Part 2)

  1. I think this is wonderful and you are off to a great start. Since this is still something new it will take a little time for them to get use to completing this work and holding themselves accountable for. Last year in first grade my students had all of their reading work in a journal and i would randomly spot check their work, they never knew what days I would do or what groups I would do but it held them accountable and towards the end of the year I no longer had to check because they understood holding themselves accountable. I think what you are doing will work wonderfully and it looks like your students are already off to a great start.

    Like

    • Thanks Jenn! It’s really good to remember that things like this just take time! I might have to try the spot checking – thanks so much for the idea!

      Like

  2. Lisa, I think it is so commendable what you are working towards with evidence! In my opinion, it sounds like your first graders are so far ahead of where so many other little ones are at with this concept. I love the chart your literacy coach shared. Perhaps working on each piece separately for a while would help? For instance, I worked with my kids a lot on being a “word thief” at the start of the year (restating the question). We decided which words we could steal to put back in our answers. Then, we moved more explicitly into finding evidence. We often use sticky flags or sticky tabs (there are some great ones at Dollar Tree that are colored, but somewhat transparent) to find the one-two parts of the text that show evidence. When the kids are writing, they refer only back to the sticky tab part. Now, I’m struggling with the elaboration piece. I’ll let you know if I find anything that works for my kiddos! Keep up the great work 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks Natalie! We’re trying! That is a good idea to stay on a piece for a while. I will definitely try out the “word thief” idea and I am going to look for those sticky tabs. Thanks so much for your ideas!

      Like

  3. Okay… I am seriously going to use the R.A.C.E method with my seventh graders! They STILL struggle with finding evidence in a text! What I am finding is that they will pull random evidence out of the text and they will quote it correctly, but the evidence has nothing to do with their argument. How to teach your students to differentiate between random information and true/important evidence? This is the kind of thing I really missed out on in my secondary undergrad focus!

    Like

    • Thanks Erin! Glad the R.A.C.E. method might be helpful for your kids! I am still trying to figure out how to show them the way to use the true and important evidence. I will let you know if I have any breakthroughs!

      Like

  4. When thinking about that RACE form for first graders, and the second graders I teach, I totally agree that it’s too much! I don’t think my kids would get what it’s asking 🙂 But I could see creating a different sheet with fill in the blanks to get the kids working towards that RACE document. Something where you practically restate the question for them but leave out a few key words that they would have to fill in. Then use a sentence starter to start the answer, ie how we would like them to start the answer. Then use a sentence starter for the citing like, “On page ___ the author said __________ which made me think _______.” Or whatever you are looking for in a citation. Does that make any sense? 🙂 Then gradually you could give less and less and they would be responsible for writing more! What do you think?

    Like

    • That totally makes sense! That is kind of what I have been doing using sentence stems and having kids finish with their thoughts. Totally agree that starting small and adding on is key! Thanks for the feedback!

      Like

  5. I use RACE in my classroom, but they’re a bit older. I also say “Echo Answer” a lot… They like the echo echo cho cho o o part so it’s fun, but then they remember to restate the question.
    What I really wanted to share with you was that I had the SAME problem with students not being prepared or finishing their assignments before our next meeting. I got so extremely frustrated. Then I created a chart and things changed. On this chart there was a spot for each group to earn stars and the way that they did that was that they each had to come to the group prepared. So if 4 students came back ready to learn but one student wasn’t ready their group couldn’t earn their star. It may sound awful at first, but my kids held each other accountable. They reminded each other to finish their work and if someone forgot, they only forgot once because they didn’t like being the reason their group didn’t earn their star. Once the group got to five stars they got a prize (a homework pass is what I used). It worked for 5 out of 6 of my reading groups and the kids were proud of themselves for being responsible. Now that we are used to it, after a group earns five stars I erase their stars and they set a new goal (maybe 7 stars instead of 5, and so on). You could try that and see if it works. However, if you find something else that works like a charm, please share it so that I can try it with that 6th group that doesn’t care about the stars! Good luck!

    Like

    • Wow thanks for the idea Jaymie! I will definitely have to try using stars with my groups! I love the idea of them working together to accomplish a goal! Thanks so much for sharing!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s